Let's Get WV Connected! Broadband in West Virginia

Working Plan

We’ll use this page as a top level menu item for a working plan.

Because we’re focused on Roane, Calhoun and Clay County, we chose the name CCRBDC. Additionally, it is wise to consider the projects and activities in adjacent counties, because we don’t want to spend a lot of effort installing fiber or services near a county line, when (perhaps) some other county effort will provide coverage for that area. You’d think the WV Broadband Enhancement Council would take on this responsibility to be the overseer of all county efforts, at least in the capacity of de-conflicting efforts. Ah, well, we’ll attempt it ourselves.

We’ll use this page as a top level menu item for a working plan.

Because we’re focused on Roane, Calhoun and Clay County, we chose the name CCRBDC. Additionally, it is wise to consider the projects and activities in adjacent counties, because we don’t want to spend a lot of effort installing fiber or services near a county line, when (perhaps) some other county effort will provide coverage for that area. You’d think the WV Broadband Enhancement Council would take on this responsibility to be the overseer of all county efforts, at least in the capacity of de-conflicting efforts. Ah, well, we’ll attempt it ourselves.

Census Tracts/Blocks is a term that keeps coming up in Broadband conversations. We’ll post more about this later, but essentially, ISP’s are required to report coverage and service levels to the FCC on Form 477. The process is fundamentally flawed and has received lots of criticism. Here’s why: if as few as one person has Broadband service in a census block, then the entire block is considered served. Funding, grants, and other aspects of service provider’s existence is tied to where they provide service, so it is not a far stretch to see where a company might put service up one road to cover that census block, and ignore the rest due to population density.